Greers Ferry Lake Fishing

Greers Ferry Lake Fishing

Greers Ferry Lake is known as one of the best fisheries in the state of Arkansas. It’s located in the central portion of the state and is situated in the Ozark foothills between Heber Springs and Clinton, Arkansas. Greers Ferry is one of the largest lakes in the state and is known for producing record-size fish in a variety of species.

Many anglers flock to Greers Ferry Lake for the outstanding largemouth bass fishing, but the lake is perhaps best known as the top spot for walleye fishing in Arkansas. In fact, the lake is home to the state-record walleye that tipped the scales at more than 22 pounds.

Just below the dam at Greers Ferry Lake is the Little Red River, which has a reputation as one of the best trout fisheries in the world. This area of the United States is teeming with different types of fly hatches, as well as other types of prey that trout can feed on throughout the year.

The clear waters of Greers Ferry Lake are also home to the world record brown trout, a 40-lbs, 4-oz. behemoth that was caught in 2009.

Greers Ferry Lake Fishing

At 31,500 acres, Greers Ferry Lake is large enough to hold abundant numbers of various kinds of freshwater fish. Anglers from around the state of Arkansas know the lake for its wide variety of species that include catfish, sunfish, largemouth bass, black bass, smallmouth bass, hybrid bass, walleye and crappie.

The lake’s 340 miles of shoreline feature everything from rolling hills to submerged trees and even steep cliffs that overlook the waters edge.

Greers Ferry Lake is located about 80 miles north of Little Rock, Arkansas and is a top destination for serious anglers who are looking to catch sizable freshwater game fish. The lake’s cool, clear waters are home to a variety of trout that include rainbow, brown, cutthroat and brook trout species.

The lake is able to sustain so many different game fish species thanks to the efforts of the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, as well as other agencies who work together to ensure that the waters of Greers Ferry Lake remain pristine and free of pollution and other troublesome elements.

Best Time to Fish Greers Ferry Lake

With so many different game fish species swimming in its waters, there truly isn’t a particular time of year when fishing is considered poor on Greers Ferry Lake. The warm summer months are excellent for catching anything from walleye to catfish or especially large and smallmouth bass.

Anglers flock to Greers Ferry Lake in droves during the spring months as this is an excellent time for catching crappie, as well as largemouth and smallmouth bass.

The crappie in the lake will typically be going through their annual spawning ritual where they can be caught in large numbers relatively easily. It’s not uncommon for anglers to catch their full limit on crappie in just a few hours fishing on Greers Ferry during the months of March or April.

The summer months are widely considered to be the best time for fishing at Greers Ferry Lake because all of the different species of fish will now be actively feeding on anything they can find.

This means anglers will have no trouble catching fish on a summer outing at the lake and fishing enthusiasts from miles around come to enjoy the bountiful opportunities for catching a range of different kinds of fish.

The fall of each year is a time when the water temperature is usually dropping and fish are still highly active throughout Greers Ferry Lake.

This is also a prime time for catching crappie, largemouth and smallmouth bass, but the lake’s sizable population of various trout are also known to begin spawning during the months of October or early November.

This section of Arkansas is well-known for having massive brown and rainbow trout, so an autumn fishing trip on Greers Ferry Lake is an excellent time for catching these big trout.

While most anglers think of winter as a time when fish will slow down and stop biting for the most part. However, this couldn’t be further from the truth as winter is an excellent time for catching monster walleye that are known to prowl the depths of Greers Ferry Lake in search of shad and other potential meals.

This is also a good time to catch some of the huge brown and rainbow trout that the lake is famous for.

Most Popular Fish Species on Greers Ferry Lake

Walleye

Ask any local angler what Greers Ferry Lake is best known for and they will likely agree that the waterway is a true gem when it comes to walleye fishing.

These species of fish are generally found in clear, cooler waters, which is why lakes and rivers in the northern portion of the United States are packed with walleye.

The southern states generally have warmer, muddy waters that are not quite as suitable for walleye. Greers Ferry Lake is home to the largest walleye ever caught in the Natural State—a 22-lb, 11-oz behemoth.

Trout

It’s no secret that Arkansas is widely considered to be one of the best locations in the country. Thanks to the state’s pristine waters that remain cool and clear for much of the year, trout are able to grow to much larger sizes than other nearby states.

Also Read: Fly Fishing Arkansas

The most prominent type of trout in Greers Ferry Lake are brown trout, which typically go through their annual spawn during the late fall. This makes the winter season an excellent time for anglers to catch hungry browns that are weary from a long spawning season.

Crappie

In recent years, crappie have made quite a comeback in Greers Ferry Lake. Their populations were once dwindling as anglers increasingly targeted the fish since they can be caught with relative ease and are considered excellent table fare.

With so many other types of fish vying for any potential meal in Greers Ferry, crappie in this lake have to be quick and cunning in order to gain an edge over other hungry game fish species. Luckily, this area of Arkansas is rich in a variety of flies and other kinds of insects or potential meals that these fish can feed on throughout the year.

Bass

The cool waters of Greers Ferry Lake are known as one of the best smallmouth bass fisheries in the state of Arkansas. With its steep cliffs and deep channels, smallmouth and largemouth bass find plenty of cover and a variety of habitat that they can use to their advantage in ambushing prey.

The lake’s largemouth bass population was once considered poor nearly 20 years ago, but with proper management by the state’s wildlife administration division, the number of largemouth has increased to a healthy, sustainable level that allows anglers to enjoy catching and even keeping some of them.

The largemouth do have to compete against a litany of other species for food, but they are known to grow up to 10 pounds in some cases.